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Toon Talk: 100 Years of Magic - 100 Movies, Part Two
Page 1 of 6

by Kirby C. Holt (archives)
December 3, 2001
In part two a special edition of Toon Talk, Kirby celebrates Walt Disney's 100th birthday by looking at 100 significant Disney films.

100 YEARS OF MAGIC - 100 MOVIES
Part Two of Two

Welcome back as we continue our Toon Talk celebration of Walt Disney's cinematic legacy, 100 Years of Magic - 100 Movies:

If you missed it, Part One is still available.

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#51. WHO LET THE DOGS OUT?

One of the most popular Disney animated features, 101 Dalmatians (released January 25, 1961) was the first to solely use the new Xerox process for transferring the animators' drawings directly to cels, an innovation that drastically reduced production time. It was used on every subsequent animated feature up to The Little Mermaid, when computers took over. 101 Dalmatians was remade in 1996 in live action, another hit that inspired it's own sequel in 2000.

#52. BOUNCING BASKETBALL PLAYERS AND A FLYING MODEL T

Walt's alter-ego Fred MacMurray starred as Ned Brainard, a.k.a. The Absent-Minded Professor (March 16, 1961), inventor of "Flubber", as in "flying rubber". A sequel, Son of Flubber, followed in 1963, as did the 1997 Robin Williams remake, dubbed Flubber.

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#53. PETTICOATS AND BLUE JEANS

Hayley Mills co-starred with herself as twins "separated at birth" who conspired to reunite their divorced parents in The Parent Trap (June 21, 1961). A baby-boomer favorite, the film inspired three television sequels and a 1998 theatrical remake.

#54. TOY STORY, TOO

Disney's first live action musical fantasy Babes in Toyland (December 14, 1961) was set in a "wonderful girl and boy land" populated by Mother Goose characters. Colorful costumes, outlandish characters and a climatic battle of the toys have made this film a holiday favorite.

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#55. CATS AND DOGS

Two dogs and a cat make The Incredible Journey (October 30, 1963) over 200 miles of treacherous terrain to make their way home. Amazing animal footage and Rex Allen's soothing narration are highlights of the film, which was remade (with celebrity animal voices added) in 1993 as Homeward Bound: The Incredible Journey.

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#56. WARTS AND ALL

Medieval England is the setting for The Sword in the Stone (December 25, 1963), Disney's animated take on the King Arthur legend. Character animation reigned in this Camelot, most notably in the riotous wizard's duel.

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#57. PRACTICALLY PERFECT

Floating on the ceiling. Hopping in and out of chalk pavement pictures. Dancing on rooftops. A very jolly holiday indeed. The crowning achievement of Walt's film making career, Mary Poppins (August 29, 1964) combined all of the magic tricks at his disposal (animation, special effects, music, design) into a supercalifragilistic treat for audiences worldwide. Based on the books of P.L. Travers (whom Walt had to sweet-talk in order to get the film rights), Poppins was nominated for 13 Academy Awards (the most for any Disney film ever, including the Studios' first Best Picture nod) and won five, including one for the perfect nanny herself, film newcomer Julie Andrews.

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#58. WILLY-NILLY SILLY OL' BEAR

When Walt purchased the rights to A.A. Milne's beloved Pooh stories, he wasn't quite sure how Americans would take to the English bear. Hedging his bets, they were adapted as shorts, starting with Winnie the Pooh and the Honey Tree (February 4, 1966). Initial success led to three more shorts (including Winnie the Pooh and the Blustery Day, Walt's last personal Oscar win) and a 1977 feature compilation titled The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh. Over the years, Pooh's popularity has exploded, including another feature (The Tigger Movie in 2000) and enough merchandise to fill the 100 Acre Wood.

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#59. ALLIGATORS, AUTOMOBILES AND VALENTINE CANDY

Based on the memoirs of real-life socialite Cordelia Drexel Biddle and the non-musical stage play they inspired, the old-fashioned musical The Happiest Millionaire (June 23, 1967) was the last feature film Walt supervised (but not the last released).

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#60. JAMMIN' IN THE JUNGLE

Disney's jazzy take on The Jungle Book (October 18, 1967) was the last animated feature Walt oversaw. Featuring the voices of such celebrities of the day as Phil Harris and Louis Prima, it was the first extensive voice casting of known personalities, a trend that continues today. Remade in live action as Rudyard Kipling's The Jungle Book in 1994.

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